Summer Schedule 2014

« Return to course schedules home

List of Courses: Spring 2014

Course Number List Courses are not currently sorted by course number Alphabetical List Courses are currently sorted by course number in descending order
LAW 705 Administrative Law [Details]

Description

This course examines the system through which a vast array of governmental power is exercised in the United States: the administrative process. Its focus will be the ways in which private interests are arranged, rearranged, and/or protected in that system against the background of the public interest. The course will address agency powers to gather and utilize information, promulgate regulations, and adjudicate rights and remedies under applicable statutes and regulations. Judicial review of adverse agency action will also be explored. This course satisfies 1 Skills Unit (for the spring semester only with Prof. Buzuvis)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View M,W 6:30 PM-7:45 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Erin Buzuvis
LAW 799 Advanced Legal Analysis [Details]

Description

Designed as a supplement to the commercial bar preparation course which every student should take upon graduation, this course will provide you with knowledge and strategies that will help you to pass the bar exam. The course will introduce you to the bar exam, review some of the material tested on the bar exam, and teach you important skills in reading, analyzing, and answering bar exam questions. The course uses a learn-by-doing approach. There will be written homework assignments - of either multiple choice questions or essay questions - that will be submitted, graded, and returned online before most classes. These assignments will then form the basis for class discussion and review. The course will focus on selected topics within three of the "big six" MBE subjects (tentatively, those subjects will be Contracts, Evidence and Torts). Students will be assigned BARBRI outlines as the written material for the course and the BARBRI AMP program as required on-line learning materials. The course is pass-fail, with the pass/fail determination based on 1) participation/ attendance (if a student misses more than 3 classes, or more than 1 homework assignment, s/he will fail the course) and 2) performance (if a student's performance falls below a certain level of competence that will be explained in the syllabus, s/he will fail the course). Students will receive feedback throughout the course. (Fall 2 credits) If a student fails as a result of performance, s/he will receive a grade of incomplete and will be required to take four additional classes in late January and February as remediation. If the failing student attends and does the work for all four additional classes, s/he will receive a grade of pass. The January-February remediation classes will also be open to students who took the Fall course and passed. (Spring 3 credits) If a student fails as a result of performance, s/he will receive a grade of incomplete and will be required to take four additional classes held during and immediately after the exam period. If the failing student attends and does the work for all four additional classes, s/he will receive a grade of pass. The January-February remediation classes will also be open to students who took the Fall course and passed. For Spring Bar Preparation class will be Limited enrollment to 12. You must receive Permission from Professor to enroll in this course . If interested in registering for this course please email the registration@law.wne.edu with the Subject Line Bar Preparation Class.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC 1 Day Samuel Stonefield
QWC 692 Advanced Legal Research and Writing [Details]

Description

Advanced Legal Research and Writing is a qualified writing course that will further develop and refine the research, analysis, citation, and writing skills introduced in the first-year course. With close supervision and guidance, students will be expected to develop their own research strategies using a wide range of research materials. Students will be responsible for maintaining a research log and bibliography for each project. The writing component of the course will consist of trial motion memoranda, nonlitigation-drafting projects, or appellate briefs. The students will also present an oral argument and serve on an appellate panel, based on the appellate briefs. The course will include peer assessment, self-editing, small group, and individual conferences, and class presentations. The class will meet once a week for two hours. Enrollment is limited to 24 students. This satisfies 1 Skills and 1 Writing Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 3 Eve Jocelyn Cuffee
LAW 650 Advanced Topics in Evidence [Details]

Description

Advanced Topics in Evidence is Evidence II. It builds on the basic Evidence course in two ways. First, it explores in detail topics that are either not covered or are covered somewhat quickly in the introductory course: privileges, expert witnesses, burdens of proof and presumptions, and best evidence and authentication rules. Second, it deepens one's understanding of several basic topics - hearsay, impeachment and character evidence -- by examining their constitutional law underpinnings through a study of the Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment and the Due Process Clause of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. Prerequisite: :LAW 553 Evidence. This course satisfies 1 Skills Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 8:00 PM-9:15 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Samuel Stonefield
LAW 685 Bankruptcy [Details]

Description

This timely course constitutes an intensive overview of federal bankruptcy law. The course begins with the Chapter 7 and 13 liquidation and reorganization provisions of the Bankruptcy Code available to consumer debtors and goes on to examine the Chapter 11 reorganization provisions of the Bankruptcy Code available to business entities. Students are exposed to the perspectives of both debtors and creditors in the bankruptcy process. Students may not enroll both in this course and in LAW 719 Debtor-Creditor Relations. It is strongly recommended that LAW 746 Secured Transactions be taken previously or concurrently.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View M,W 8:00 PM-9:15 PM/Room BLC C Eve Henry Boroff
LAW 688 Bioethics [Details]

Description

This is a survey course that will cover a variety of bioethics topics through the lenses of law, ethics, medicine, and public policy. Topics may include reproductive technologies and rights, medical decision-making, end of life care, distributive justice topics, and research on human subjects.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC 3 Day Barbara Noah
LAW 551 Business Organizations [Details]

Description

This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual framework of business organizations law including the formation and conduct of business in the partnership, corporate, and limited liability company forms. It provides an introduction to the terminology of business organizations and finance, and transmits some sense of what a business lawyer does. It also engages in questions of ethics, justice, professional responsibility and critical analysis of numerous aspects of business law. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View M,Th 7:30 PM-8:45 PM/Room BLC A Eve Rene Reich-Graefe
QWCS724 Business Succession Planning [Details]

Description

This course will consider that issues that owners of closely held businesses face in the operation and disposition of their business interests. The course will consider the operational and transfer problems for unrelated business owners as well as the operational and transfer problems for family owned businesses. Areas of study will include buy/sell agreements, life insurance, and alternative methods of succession. Note: This course was formerly called Business & Estate Planning/Closely-Held Business Entities. Limited to 24 Students. This course satisfies 3 Skills or 3 Writing Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC 4 Day Frederick Royal
LAW 509 Civil Procedure [Details]

Description

The object of this course is to introduce students to the civil litigation process, including the attendant jurisdictional questions, court organization, and pleadings and rules of practice in state and federal courts. In addition, an analysis of the litigation process is undertaken, with emphasis on discovery, pretrial procedures, trial, judgment, and appellate review of the decision. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 6 View F 10:45 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC A,
M,W 10:30 AM-11:30 AM/Room BLC A
Day Taylor Flynn
02 6 View F 10:45 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC B,
M,W 10:30 AM-11:30 AM/Room BLC B
Day Bruce Miller
03 6 View W 7:00 PM-8:15 PM/Room BLC 3,
Th 6:00 PM-7:15 PM/Room BLC 3
Eve Peter Adomeit
LAW 735 Civil Rts Police Misconduct [Details]

Description

This course offers an introduction to federal civil rights litigation, principally under 42 U.S.C. sec. 1983, in the context of claims of misconduct such as wrongful arrest, imprisonment, and other wrongful denials of liberty; wrongful prosecution; excessive force; illegal search and seizure; wrongful interference with first amendment rights; and failure to protect. It will also examine immunity, defenses, and supervisory and government liability.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC 3 Day Anne Goldstein
LAW 660 Closely Held Businesses [Details]

Description

As part of the advanced curriculum in the law of business organizations, this course provides an in-depth analysis of the myriad legal problems involved in the formation and operation of closely held businesses, i.e., those businesses whose ownership interests are not publicly traded. We will consider unincorporated business entities - including the general partnership, the limited partnership (LP), the limited liability partnership (LLP), and the limited liability company (LLC) - as well as the incorporated closely held business in the form of the close corporation. The main issues discussed for each form of business organization are the mechanics of entity formation; management and control of the closely held business; financial rights and liabilities of the entities owners; fiduciary duties among the entities owners; the transferability of entity ownership; and exit rights during dissociation and dissolution. Prerequisite: Law 551 Business Organizations.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC D Day Rene Reich-Graefe
LAW 798 Connecticut Practice & Procedure [Details]

Description

This course provides students with a practical understanding of Connecticut practice and procedure as it relates to criminal and civil litigation. The course will emphasize the practices and procedures that are most relevant to the daily practice of law and the most common issues that litigants face in Connecticut courts. Students will develop a useful understanding of how the practice of law is grounded in the Connecticut Procedural Rules as well as relevant statutory and case law authority.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC B Eve Joseph Burns
LAW 501 Constitutional Law [Details]

Description

This course is a study of the allocation of governmental authority and the limitations on that authority as defined by the Constitution of the United States. The course will deal with the problems of defining the scope of federal power, the relationship between the federal government and the states, the scope of state authority, and the rights of individuals with an emphasis on those rights guaranteed by the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Constitution. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 4 View Tu,Th 1:00 PM-2:50 PM/Room BLC A Day Arthur Wolf
02 4 View Tu,Th 1:00 PM-2:50 PM/Room BLC B Day Jennifer Levi
LAW 503 Contracts [Details]

Description

This course introduces students to the law governing legally enforceable agreements with a focus on the rights and duties of contracting parties. In focusing on how promissory relationships are created by the parties, the course emphasizes how these relationships are interpreted, limited, discharged, breached, and enforced. The course also addresses the ethical and equitable considerations affecting the contracting parties.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 6 View Tu,Th,F 9:30 AM-10:30 AM/Room BLC A Day Amy Cohen
02 6 View Tu,Th,F 9:30 AM-10:30 AM/Room BLC B Day Sudha Setty
03 6 View M 7:00 PM-8:15 PM/Room BLC 3,
Th 7:30 PM-8:45 PM/Room BLC 3
Eve Matthew Charity
LAW 694 Conveyancing [Details]

Description

This course concerns the legal aspects of the purchase and sale of real estate, beginning with the real estate broker and concluding with the closing process. The course covers in detail the purchase and sale agreement and remedies for the breach of the agreement; title examination and title insurance; property description and deed drafting; RESPA forms and regulation and closing adjustments; the closing process; and ethical considerations in representation of parties in real estate transactions. Enrollment limited to 45 students. Prerequisite is Law 511 Property.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC C Eve Arthur Gaudio
LAW 717 Corporate Tax [Details]

Description

A study of the body of law devoted to the federal taxation of corporations with emphasis on the tax problems of small businesses, including the formation, structure, and distribution of profits by corporations. Also studied are stock redemptions, accumulated earnings, and personal holding company taxes. Taxation of partnerships will be included in the three-credit course. Prerequisite: LAW 747, Income Tax II

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC D Day William Metzger
LAWS920 Criminal Law Clinic [Details]

Description

Students in the Criminal Clinic work as student assistant district attorneys within the Hampden County District Attorney's Office. By court rule, students in the Clinic are authorized to practice in any District Court case, which includes a mix of both misdemeanors and felonies. Typical of the offenses litigated by students in the District Court are possession and/or distribution of controlled substances, domestic violence offenses including assault and battery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, and violation of a restraining order, larceny, assault and battery on a police officer, and driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. During the course of the semester, a student attorney will appear in three different sessions of the District Court: the arraignment session (in which students represent the Commonwealth in bail hearings), the motion session (in which students prepare and litigate oppositions to motions to suppress and motions to dismiss) and, ultimately, the trial session (in which a student prepare and litigate jury and jury-waived trials.) This clinic allows students to gain substantial exposure over the course of the semester to the entire process of litigating a criminal case. In addition to the fieldwork as a student attorney within the Hampden County District Attorney's Office, there is a classroom component which operates as a combination seminar/simulation. This part of the course is quite intensive for the first three or four weeks of the semester as well as the week prior to the start of classes. Students must attend a two day orientation the week before classes begin, no exceptions will be made to this mandatory orientation. Following this initial training period, the class will meet at the designated time for a two-hour session on a weekly basis for the balance of the semester. Prerequisites: LAW 553, Evidence and LAW 706, Criminal Procedure Investigation. Enrollment is limited each semester to eight third-year full time and fourth-year part time students who have been selected through the clinic application process. No student may maintain outside legal employment while participating in this clinic. All students will be CORI/criminal records checked by the District Attorney's Office. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student must successfully complete 32 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 3 Skills and 1 Writing Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 4 View - TBA Tina Cafaro
LAWS921 Criminal Law Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, there is a classroom component which operates as a combination seminar/simulation. This part of the course is quite intensive for the first three or four weeks of the semester as well as the week prior to the start of classes. Students must attend a two day orientation the week before classes begin; no exceptions will be made to this mandatory orientation. Following this initial training period, the class will meet at a designated time for a two-hour session on a weekly basis for the balance of the semester. Prerequisites: LAW 553, Evidence and LAW 706, Criminal Procedure Investigation. Enrollment is limited each semester to eight third-year full time and fourth-year part time students who have been selected through the clinic application process. No student may maintain outside legal employment while participating in this clinic. All students will be CORI/criminal records checked by the District Attorney's Office. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View W 2:30 PM-4:20 PM/Room Mt Ct Day Tina Cafaro
LAWS617 Criminal Pre-Trial Practice [Details]

Description

This course is aimed at developing student written and oral advocacy skills in the pre-trial phase of criminal litigation. The course will concentrate on the pre-trial stages of a hypothetical criminal case. The course will allow students to work on this case from the pre-trial conference up to jury selection. Students will brief and argue typical evidentiary and discovery motions arising prior to trial. The course will also address pre-trial strategies and preparation, including motions in limine and jury instructions. At the end of the term students will present oral arguments on motions to suppress statements, identification and evidence. The course will require at least 4 hours of preparation per session. Class attendance is mandatory. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. This course satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Charles Groce
QWCS780 Criminal Procedure Simulation [Details]

Description

This course concentrates on the procedural stages of two hypothetical criminal cases from arraignment through trial. The principal purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to improve their writing and trial skills in the context of preparing and trying a state criminal case. Students will be required to research, write and re-write pretrial motions along with supporting affidavits and memoranda of law and to litigate two simulated exercises, a pretrial motion to suppress and a jury trial. Prerequisites: LAW 706 Criminal Procedure: Investigation and LAW 553 Evidence. Students, who have not taken or registered to take LAW 905 Criminal Law Clinic, will be given priority in registering for this course. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. This course satisfies the Qualified Writing Requirement. This course satisfies 2 Writing and 1 Skills Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC 4 Day Arthur Leavens
LAW 796 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication [Details]

Description

This course examines the constitutional basis of criminally accused persons' post-arrest rights, in the context of, e.g.: bail and pretrial release, discovery, the right to counsel, guilty pleas, burdens and standards of proof, selection and composition of the jury, confrontation, effective assistance of counsel, jury instructions, double jeopardy, and other rights incident to criminal trials, appeals, and collateral review. Completion of LAW 706 Criminal Procedure: Investigation is NOT a prerequisite to enrollment in this course. This course satisfies 1 Skills Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 6:30 PM-7:45 PM/Room BLC B Eve Giovanna Shay
LAW 644 Domestic Violence [Details]

Description

This course combines a scholarly and practice-oriented approach to understanding the legal response to domestic violence. Throughout the course, we will focus on the social context of battering, including how the experience of abuse is shaped by gender, race, cultural identity, immigration status, sexual orientation, and disabilities. We will cover the various legal remedies in both civil and criminal contexts and examine their efficacy. These include the role of protective orders in both civil and criminal courts. We will also discuss domestic violence in relation to divorce, child custody, support, visitation, and the child protection matters. Gender violence as a human rights violation, sexual assault law, and the role of the domestic violence movement are also introduced. The focus of this course is to examine current challenges and shortcomings in the legal response to domestic violence, and then consider proposals for alternative strategies for systemic change.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC D Day Giovanna Shay
LAW 664 Elder Law [Details]

Description

This course will focus on the legal problems associated with the elderly and the aging. Areas of instruction will include social, psychological, legal, and financial aspects of planning for the elderly. Topics of special concern will include Medicaid benfits, nursing home institutionalization, estate planning, and social security benefits. Other topics to be discussed will include abuse of the elderly, insurance issues, tax issues, health care proxies and guardianship issues, and creating and maintaining an elder law practice.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Th 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC 3 Day Margot Parrot
QWC 959 End of Life Issues [Details]

Description

This course explores topics in end of life law in more depth and builds on concepts learned in Bioethics & Law. There is no prerequisite. Topics include right to refuse treatment, informed consent, surrogate decision-making, physician aid in dying, withdrawal of life-supportive therapies, and end of life care dispute resolution. The course begins with coverage of key legal and ethical concepts in end of life law and will also emphasize the complex interplay between law, ethics, and the provision of medical care. Activities for the course include mock Ethics Committee meetings, client interviewing and counseling, completion of advance care planning documents, student-led discussion, and a substantial original research paper on a topic approved by the instructor. This satisfies 1 Skills and 1 Writing Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 2 Eve Barbara Noah
QWCS723 Estate Planning [Details]

Description

This course is the study of the inter vivos and testamentary disposition of accumulated wealth. Students draft simple and complex estate plans. Emphasis is given also to the tax and non-tax considerations that influence the transfer and future management of wealth. Prerequisites: LAW 722 Estate and Gift Tax and LAW 748 Trusts & Estates. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This course satisfies 3 Skills or 3 Writing Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 4 View Tu,Th 10:00 AM-11:50 AM/Room BLC 2 Day William Baker
LAW 553 Evidence [Details]

Description

This course is an introduction to the basic rules of evidence governing the proof of facts in criminal and civil trials, with a focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Topics covered may include the role of the judge and jury; relevance; hearsay and its exceptions; character evidence; and the competency, examination and impeachment of witnesses. Classroom method focuses on discussion of selected problems and cases and aims at providing a foundation for advanced courses in evidence (such as Advanced Topics in Evidence and the Scientific Evidence seminar, trial advocacy, and criminal procedure), while providing all students with a common grounding in the basic rules of evidence. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC 3 Day Anne Goldstein
03 3 View Th 6:00 PM-7:15 PM/Room BLC A,
W 7:30 PM-8:45 PM/Room BLC A
Eve Arthur Leavens
LAW 643 Family Law [Details]

Description

This course examines the relationship between family and law. Topics addressed include legal definitions of "family" taking into consideration both the marital and non-marital family; rights and obligations among family members; the federal and state government's role in family life as well as the constitutional limits on government involvement; dissolution of family including issues of property distribution, alimony/support, and the implications of children; jurisdiction; and the role of the attorney in family formation and disputes. This course satisfies 1 Skills Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Taylor Flynn
QWC 757 Fed Lit: Pension Rights [Details]

Description

This simulation course focuses on the pre-trial stages of a hypothetical ERISA case in federal district court. Although some aspects of substantive ERISA law will be addressed, the chief aims of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to improve their writing, oral advocacy, and negotiation skills and to consider the strategic, political, and ethical dimensions of federal court litigation. Each student will be required to write several briefs and to present at least one oral argument. In addition, each student will draft a complaint or an answer, draft a discovery plan, prepare for a pre-trial conference, and engage in settlement negotiations. This is a Restricted Withdrawal class which means that a student enrolled in the class may not withdraw subsequent to the second class of the semester (see, Academic Standards Part A, VI, B). Enrollment limited to 24 students. This satisfies 3 Skills or 3 Writing Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC 3 Day Bruce Miller
LAW 641 Federal Tax Practice & Procedure [Details]

Description

This course will include the study of the U.S. tax system, the administration of the Internal Revenue Code by the Internal Revenue Service, procedural Problems in requests for administrative rulings, the handling of audits, the treatment of tax deficiencies and tax penalties, closing and compromise agreements, statutes of limitations, hearings before the Appeals Office, litigation in the U.S. Tax Court, the Federal District Court, and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, collection matters, and criminal and civil aspects of fraud. Prerequisite: LAW 555 Income Tax I.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC D Eve Carmino Santaniello
LAW 782 Forensic Evidence [Details]

Description

This course will examine the evidentiary foundations necessary for the introduction and use of forensic evidence in both criminal and civil trials. Special emphasis will be placed on the practical application and use of complicated scientific evidence including medical evidence, DNA, ballistics, arson, fingerprints, toxicology and psychological/psychiatric testimony. The work frame around which these issues will be discussed are the Daubert/Lannigan cases and their progeny. It is highly recommended that students have completed a course in basic evidence Law 553 prior to enrollment.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Louis Aloise
LAW 629 Gender & the Law [Details]

Description

This course examines issues of gender in the law from the standpoint of feminist legal jurisprudence, particularly the way it is affected by and constructs gender in our society. Topics may include the law of sexual harassment, sexual autonomy and reproductive choice, workplace discrimination, legal regulation of welfare and low-income women, and the way in which a legal definition of sex (or the lack of it) influences law and social policy. (QWC Optional)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View M 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC D Day Jennifer Levi
QWC 629 Gender & the Law [Details]

Description

This course examines issues of gender in the law from the standpoint of feminist legal jurisprudence, particularly the way it is affected by and constructs gender in our society. Topics may include the law of sexual harassment, sexual autonomy and reproductive choice, workplace discrimination, legal regulation of welfare and low-income women, and the way in which a legal definition of sex (or the lack of it) influences law and social policy. (QWC Optional)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View M 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC D Day Jennifer Levi
LAWS914 Housing Clinic [Details]

Description

Students in the Housing Clinic represent tenants with complaints against landlords in the Western Massachusetts Housing Court. The Housing Clinic is currently cooperating with the Massachusetts Justice Project(MJP). Through MJP, students will acquire clients who have cases pending in the summary process (eviction) session of the Hampden County session of the Western Massachusetts Housing Court. Under the supervision of the Clinic's Supervising Attorney, students will represent tenants in the prosecution and litigation of their cases. Students will handle all phases of the case, including case evaluation, client interviewing, negotiation of possible settlement, legal research and factual development of the claims, and representation of the litigants in court proceedings. If the case does not settle, trials are before a single justice of the Housing Court. Trial may include direct testimony of the witnesses, cross-examination, opening statements and closing arguments and introduction of evidence. Students are also required to participate in a pro see limited assistance clinic on Friday afternoons. Students must also enroll in a two credit seminar concurrent with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 32 hours of law studies and have successfully completed Law 553, Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View -/Room Clinic TBA Gordon Shaw
LAWS915 Housing Clinic Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, there will be regularly scheduled seminar meetings and training sessions in which Housing Clinic students will engage in discussions and simulation exercises to develop the professional skills and perspectives which are essential to such a litigation practice. Students enrolling in this Clinic must be willing to return to school in advance of the official start of the semester to participate in a mandatory orientation. This course continues to be intensive during the first several weeks of the semester. Thereafter, the class will meet regularly for the balance of the semester. Prerequisites: The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 32 hours of law studies and who have been selected through the clinic application process. Students must have successfully completed Law 553, Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View W 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room Clinic Day Gordon Shaw
LAW 651 Immigration Law [Details]

Description

This course will explore the American immigration system from constitutional, statutory, and policy perspectives. Topics considered include the source and scope of congressional power to regulate immigration, standards and procedures for entry, exclusion, and deportation, illegal migration, and the acquisition and loss of American citizenship.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC C Day Arthur Wolf
LAW 747 Income Tax II [Details]

Description

A continuation of the study of the law as it relates to the federal taxation of the income of individuals. This course explores the tax concepts of realization and recognition of income, the character of gains and losses from the disposition of property, and tax accounting methods. The course also explores the role of debt in property transactions and may include a discussion of assignment of income principles. Prerequisite: Law 555 Income Tax I.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View M 6:10 PM-7:25 PM/Room BLC C,
W 6:30 PM-7:45 PM/Room BLC C
Eve William Metzger
LAW 958 International Criminal Law [Details]

Description

This course will explore the recognition and prosecution of international crimes (war crimes, aggression, genocide, crimes against humanity, torture, and terrorism) by international and national courts. We will study the development of the law of these crimes, with a focus on the elements of crimes, but also considering issues of jurisdiction, modes of liability, and defenses. The goal of the course will be to understand the law and its development, as well as changes and growth in the application of the law in the courts that pursue these cases. The course in public international law is helpful, but is not a prerequisite.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC F Day Matthew Charity
LAWS912 International Human Rights Clinic [Details]

Description

Students work collaboratively on projects with domestic and international nongovernmental organizations, grass-roots organizations, solidarity networks, attorneys, stakeholders, and other institutions engaging in human rights work, to advance political, economic, social and cultural human rights across borders. Students are expected to commit at least 16 hours per week to the fieldwork. Students must also enroll in a two credit seminar concurrent with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 32 hours of law studies and who have been selected through the clinic application process. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 2 Skills and 2 Writing Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 4 View - TBA Lauren Carasik
LAWS913 International Human Rights Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, International Human Rights Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled seminar meeting which will include guest speakers and simulated exercises. Prerequisites: The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 32 hours of law studies and who have been selected through the clinic application process. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This course satisfies the Skills Requirement. This satisfies 1 Skills Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View W 9:00 AM-10:50 AM/Room BLC E Day Lauren Carasik
LAWP907 Judicial Externship [Details]

Description

Students work 12 hours a week for a total of 168 semester hours engaging in a variety of legal work under the supervision of a judge. Students may not receive compensation for work done in an Externship. Externships include varied levels of research, writing, and observation depending on the student's placement. Students may take no more than three externships for a maximum of nine academic credits during law school. The externship placements must be substantively different. A student must successfully complete 32 hours of law studies before enrollment in an externship. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. There will be a mandatory orientation meeting prior to the start of the semester for all students participating in their first externship. This satisfies 3 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
21 3 View -,
BA -
TBA Jeanne Kaiser
LAWP906 Judicial Externship Seminar [Details]

Description

This course is the seminar component that accompanies a judicial externship placement that a student has been selected for through the externship application process. Seminar assignments and readings are designed to complement the individual work experience by providing structured reflection on many aspects of the roles of courts, judges and lawyers in society. Students are also required to maintain weekly time sheets and journals and complete a research assignment. A student enrolling in a first externship must concurrently enroll in the applicable one credit externship seminar. For additional requirements, please see Judicial Externship description. An Externship Seminar Enrollment form must be completed for enrollment. Students receive 3 credits for the externship and 1 credit for seminar participation.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
21 1 View W 4:00 PM-4:50 PM/Room BLC 3 Day Jeanne Kaiser
QWC 619 Labor Law Arbitration [Details]

Description

This course will present an in-depth view of the law of labor arbitration and the law of the labor contract. Because it is a QWC, the course will emphasize writing skills in the arbitration context. Rather than writing a large research project, the students will instead have weekly writing assignments of between five and ten pages per week. By breaking the writing down into smaller components, the student will be able to demonstrate a steadily improving understanding of the complexities of legal writing as well as learning about such issues as what disputes may be arbitrated, the drafting of the issue for arbitration, preparation of a pre-hearing memorandum, the content of arbitration, post-arbitration briefs, and actions to confirm or set aside awards. The course will explore the labor contract in a number of contexts, which may include discipline and discharge, pay disputes, promotion, layoffs and recalls, mandatory overtime or any of the other types of disputes which go to arbitration. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. This course satisfies the Qualified Writing Requirement. This course satisfies 3 Writing Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Peter Adomeit
LAW 730 Land Finance & Transfer [Details]

Description

This course focuses on the law and practices that govern the financing of real estate transactions, from single-family residences and residential sub-divisions, to multi-family apartment buildings and commercial real estate. The course examines in great detail the law of mortgages, including the creation and transfer of mortgage interests, lien priorities and foreclosure with a limited discussion of bankruptcy. Prerequisite: Law 511 Property. This satisfies 1 Skills Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC D Day Arthur Gaudio
LAW 625 Land Use Planning [Details]

Description

This course will cover the fundamentals of land use currently in place in the United States. This will begin with the "takings" issue and go on to examine public zoning schemes and private land use, control through the use of covenants and private associations. Subdivision control statutes, "approval not required" plans and design standards for residential and commercial developments will also be covered. Throughout the course there will be discussions on how the practitioner can work most effectively with the boards that administer the zoning regulations. The course will conclude, time permitting, by examining active topics such as special district zoning and the impact of non-zoning enactments such as wetlands protection laws and other environmental statutes on land use decisions. Students may not take both this course and LAW 624 Land Use Controls.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC 3 Day Julie Steiner
LAW 632 Law Office Management [Details]

Description

This course will introduce students to the operation and management of solo practices, law firms, and corporate legal departments. Practices and techniques that assist in the ethical, professional, and profitable representation of clients while reducing stress and crisis situations will be presented through presentations, readings, and guest lecturers. Topics to be covered include: business planning; time management, accounting and billing; client recruitment and relations; technology and office systems; stress management and personal support; ethical responsibilities and professionalism.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC C Eve Michael Agen
LAWP909 Law Practice Externship [Details]

Description

Students work 12 hours a week for a total of 168 semester hours engaging in a variety of legal work under the supervision of an attorney in a public interest, government service, or private sector externship placement. Externships develop students' lawyering skills through participation in activities such as legal research and writing, client interviewing and counseling, factual investigation, development and implementation of case theory and strategy, negotiation, mediation, litigation and other forms of advocacy. Students may take no more than three externships for a maximum of nine academic credits during law school. The externship placements must be substantively different. A student must successfully complete 32 hours of law studies before enrollment in an externship. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. There will be a mandatory orientation meeting prior to the start of the semester for all students participating in their first externship. This satisfies 3 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
29 3 View BA -,
-/Room BLC 4
TBA Myra Orlen
LAWP910 Law Practice Externship Seminar [Details]

Description

This course is the seminar component that accompanies a law practice externship, public interest, government service, or private sector externship placement that a student has been selected for through the externship application process. Seminar assignments and readings are designed to complement the individual work experience by providing structured reflection on many aspects of the roles of courts, judges and lawyers in society. Students are also required to maintain weekly time sheets and journals and complete a research assignment. A student enrolling in their first externship must concurrently enroll in the applicable one credit externship seminar. Please see the Law Practice Externship description for additional requirements. An Externship Seminar Enrollment form must be completed for enrollment in the Law Practice Seminar. Students receive 3 credits for the field placement and 1 credit for seminar participation

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
29 1 View Th 4:00 PM-4:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Myra Orlen
LAW 954 Law Review [Details]

Description

Students who are members of Law Review are required to attend the mandatory weekly Law Review staff meeting for both the fall and spring semesters. Members of the Junior Staff receive 2 credits in the fall and 1 credit in the spring for the successful completion of their Junior Staff year. Senior members of the Law Review receive between 2 and 6 credits per year, depending on their position on the Law Review. The Associate Dean must approve departures from these semester credit allocations.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
04 1 View M 5:00 PM-6:00 PM/Room BLC A Eve Giovanna Shay
05 2 View M 5:00 PM-6:00 PM/Room BLC A Eve Giovanna Shay
06 3 View M 5:00 PM-6:00 PM/Room BLC A Eve Giovanna Shay
LAW 507 Legal Research & Writing [Details]

Description

Legal Research and Writing is a required first-year course designed to introduce students to the essential problem-solving and communication skills of the legal profession. The legal research and writing faculty work closely with students in smaller classroom settings to introduce techniques of legal analysis, the basic sources and processes of legal research, and the principles of legal writing and oral advocacy. Through a series of assignments of increasing complexity, students learn how to analyze legal problems, research legal issues, frame legal arguments, and gain experience in drafting the major forms of predictive and persuasive legal writing. This full-year course culminates in an oral argument in a simulated court setting during which each student argues a motion based on a brief written by the student. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 4 View M,W 6:00 PM-6:50 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Jocelyn Cuffee
10 4 View M,W 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room BLC 1 Day Beth Cohen
11 4 View M,W 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room BLC 4 Day Jeanne Kaiser
12 4 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC 1 Day Jocelyn Cuffee
14 4 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC 2 Day Patricia Newcombe
15 4 View M,W 6:00 PM-6:50 PM/Room BLC 2 Eve Myra Orlen
16 4 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Jeanne Kaiser
LAWS916 Legal Services Clinic [Details]

Description

Students work in the office of Community Legal Aid (CLA), a local non-profit organization charged with providing free civil legal services to low-income and elderly persons. Under the supervision of the program's attorneys, students assume primary professional responsibility for actual cases, including client interviews, counseling, case development, negotiation and representation of clients in court and administrative proceedings. Students work at CLA for 16 hours a week and earn four credits for the fieldwork. Students must also enroll in a one credit seminar concurrent with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 32 hours of law studies and who have been selected through the clinic application process. In the semester prior to the fieldwork, students must enroll in a two credit skills seminar that uses simulations, reading and discussion to develop the lawyering skills necessary for client representation. Law 553, Evidence is also a required. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 3 Skills and 1 Writing Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 4 View - TBA Hisham Abouelleil
LAWS917 Legal Services Clinic Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, Legal Services Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled seminar meeting. Prerequisites: The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 32 hours of law studies and who have been selected through the clinic application process. In the semester prior to the fieldwork, students must enroll in a two credit skills seminar that uses simulations, reading and discussion to develop the lawyering skills necessary for client representation. Law 553, Evidence is also a required. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 1 View W 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC E Day Hisham Abouelleil
LAWS910 Legal Services: Skills Seminar [Details]

Description

Students participating in the Legal Services clinic must complete a two credit lawyering skills seminar the semester prior to their semester of field placement. The class focuses on substantive law and issues related to poverty law practice, and developing basic lawyering skills, including professionalism and ethics, client interviewing, counseling, case planning, fact investigation, oral advocacy, negotiation and litigation skills. This satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Th 9:00 AM-10:50 AM/Room BLC E Day Hisham Abouelleil
LAWS728 Mediation [Details]

Description

This course will provide training in both the theory and methodology of divorce and family mediation and essential mediation skills. The class is interactive, and students will have the opportunity, in almost every class to practice mediation skills. A basic understanding of Massachusetts divorce law and/or entry level family law course is strongly recommended. Some states, by statute or rule of court, set standards for court-based mediators. Massachusetts requires basic mediation training and professional practice under the supervision of a community-based mediation program before practitioners may serve as court-based mediators. This is a basic mediation course that qualifies successful students for an internship or practicum in a community dispute resolution program for supervised practice and for advanced mediation training. Mediators develop their skills through a lifetime of practice. This is the first step. Enrollment limited to 18 students. This course satisfies 3 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 3 View Th 5:20 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Oran Kaufman
LAWS769 Negotiation,Mediation & Arbitration [Details]

Description

This course will focus on negotiation and other methods of dispute resolution, with emphasis on negotiated settlement, mediation and arbitration. Negotiation theory and alternative tactics and strategies will be examined, with focus on practical skills by way of example and simulated exercises. Various methods of alternative dispute resolution will be discussed in the context of different areas of legal practice and substantive law. Students will participate in simulated negotiation, simulated mediation, and arbitration. The course will cover the arbitration process from both a substantive law and practical skills standpoint. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. Students who have taken LAW 609 Negotiation: Strategies & Practice may not enroll in this course. This course satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC B Eve Kevin Roy
LAW 770 New York Practice and Procedure [Details]

Description

This course is designed to introduce the New York Court System and its procedure, pursuant to the Civil Practice Law & Rules (CPLR). The concept of jurisdiction in the state will be examined in detail as well as the commencement of a civil action and its interplay with jurisdictional principles, within, and outside New York's boundaries. A variety of issues will then be reviewed, such as service, defects of same, defenses to, and appearances. Important emphasis will be placed on limitations of time in actions, such as intentional torts, and medical malpractice, taking into account laches, tolls, extensions, and interposing other claims.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 2 Eve Kevin O'Brien
LAW 575 Professional Responsibility [Details]

Description

This course examines the ethics of lawyering and the various roles of the lawyer. We will discuss the nature and scope of the attorney's responsibilities and obligations to clients, society, the administration of justice, the profession, and the self. It covers legal and ethical standards and aspirations relevant to regulating the conduct of lawyers and the development of professional ethics. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC B Eve Kevin O'Regan
LAW 511 Property [Details]

Description

Starting with the historical evolution of the concepts involved in real and personal property, this course will study the rights and duties of owners and possessors of property, priority of possession or property, and present and future interests in property. This course will also consider issues in landlord and tenant law, evidence of ownership or right to possession, methods of title assurance, commercial and noncommercial transfers of interests in property, the rescission, modification, interpretation and performance of transfer agreements and documents, and private controls on the use of property. This course may also explore conflicts between private ownership of property and community needs, the nature and purposes of types of shared ownership of property, and public controls on the use of property. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 5 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC A Day James Gordon
02 5 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC B Day William Baker
03 5 View M,W 6:00 PM-7:15 PM/Room BLC D Eve James Gordon
LAWS657 Real Estate Development [Details]

Description

This course will focus on real estate planning using the development of a shopping center as paradigm. In the course, we will take the development project from the acquisition of land, through financing and construction of the shopping center, and finish with the leasing of stores in the shopping center. Students will be assigned to law firms of two or three students each and over the course of the semester each firm will negotiate with another firm three separate aspects of the development process. For example, students in a firm may negotiate a long term ground lease, the construction financing of the shopping center, and an anchor tenant lease. The firms will also draft all the documents appropriate to those transactions, prepare brief memos journaling their experience, and make short presentations on them in class. Course grade will be based on the document drafting, journal memos, and presentation. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Preference will be given to students who have not taken 657 Real Estate Development. This course satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View M 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC E Day Arthur Gaudio
LAWS947 Real Property Practice Practicum [Details]

Description

In addition to the field placement, students attend a regularly scheduled seminar meeting. The first two weeks of the semester involve hands-on training, homework and simulations in title examination and residential real estate closings. Thereafter, the seminar will have required readings and discussions structured and led by the two faculty members and frequently featuring presentations by experts in different aspects of real estate transactions. As prerequisites for the course, students must have taken 2 or more of the following 6 courses: Land Finance and Transfer, Conveyancing, Real Estate Transactions, Taxation of Property, Land Use and Landlord-Tenant. The more prerequisites you have taken, the better, and Professors Baker and Stonefield strongly urge students to take (and will give preference in selection to students who have taken or will take) Land Finance and Transfer or Conveyancing. Enrollment is limited to 10 students in the spring semester only who have been selected through the clinic application process. A student must successfully complete 32 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 1 Skills Unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View - TBA William Baker, Samuel Stonefield
LAWS946 Real Property Practice Seminar [Details]

Description

In the Real Estate Practicum, students are placed with real estate practice with real estate practitioners and are required to commit 10 hours per week (two sessions of 5 hours). Placements are done as a member of a two-person team. One member of the team is initially placed with a real estate attorney specializing in residential real estate, the other with an attorney at a title insurance company. Each team member works for six weeks with one attorney or the other and then switches right before spring break. In both placements, students work on a variety of title, closing, contract and related problems and will observe the operation of a law office and the interaction with clients, staff and other real estate professionals (brokers, lenders, appraisers, surveyors). As indicated on the List of Pairings, two team placements are in Springfield; two are in Connecticut (Windsor Locks and Hartford); one is split between Springfield and Hartford. Students must also enroll in a two credit seminar concurrent with their semester of fieldwork. As prerequisites for the course, students must have taken 2 or more of the following 6 courses: Land Finance and Transfer, Conveyancing, Real Estate Transactions, Taxation of Property, Land Use and Landlord-Tenant. The more prerequisites you have taken, the better, and Professors Baker and Stonefield strongly urge students to take (and will give preference in selection to students who have taken or will take) Land Finance and Transfer or Conveyancing. Enrollment is limited to 10 students in the spring semester only who have been selected through the clinic application process. A student must successfully complete 32 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View W 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC 2 Day William Baker, Samuel Stonefield
LAW 672 Representing Children [Details]

Description

This course will review children's constitutional rights followed by a study in non-delinquency matters in which children are parties (Care and Protections, Children in Need in Services, etc.). Special emphasis will be placed on counsel's role in communicating with child clients and selecting litigation options (class actions, tort actions) to protect children's rights. Child-abuse matters and state's failure to provide children's services will be emphasized.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC E Eve Michael Donnelly
LAW 743 Securities Litigation [Details]

Description

From the billion dollar lawsuits that threaten Wall Street titans to claims by "mom and pop" investors that their broker sold them a bad stock, securities litigation has become big business for lawyers in all walks of life. In the wake of the financial crisis of 2008, investment-related litigation has exploded, dominating media headlines and court dockets. At the same time, as America's baby-boom generation approaches retirement relying on stock portfolio nest eggs, investor-related disputes have the potential to affect virtually all future lawyers' clientele. This course is intended to provide an introduction to securities litigation, not only for students who are interested in developing a practice in the area, but also for those who plan to practice business law and those who simply seek a sufficient knowledge base to competently advise clients who present problems regarding their investments. The course will also explore topics concerning disputes common to the owners of small businesses organized as closely held corporations, limited partnerships, and limited liability companies, providing students with an overview of the typical issues arising in resolving internal business disputes. Expected topics include federal securities claims, shareholder derivative litigation, litigating state "Blue Sky" claims, internal corporate governance issues and broker-dealer investor litigation. There are no prerequisites but students are strongly encouraged to have completed the required course in Law 551 Business Organizations prior to enrolling. Limited to 20 students.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 3 Eve Michael Blanchard
LAWS944 Small Business Clinic [Details]

Description

The Small Business Clinic will provide selected students with the opportunity to handle legal matters for small business clients under the supervision of the professor. Students work on transactional legal matters that are typical in the start-up phase of a business. The goal of the clinic is to expose students to the methodology and mindset of business lawyering. Law students work with the entrepreneurs to identify the legal issues new businesses confront. Clinic students participate in weekly one-on-one meetings with the professor, meetings with clients (often in the evenings) and participation in walk-in legal assistance. The clinical component will involve client interviewing, assessment and intake, along with legal research, drafting, and counseling as the situation requires. In an effort to operate the clinic as close to an actual law firm as possible, students are required to maintain client billing records through use of the clinic's time/document management software. Client work will require a minimum of 16 hours of work per week and other course commitments will require an additional four to five hours per week. Students must also enroll in a two credit seminar concurrent with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: LAW 551. Business Organizations, Law 553, Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student must successfully complete 32 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. This course satisfies the Skills Requirement.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 4 View - TBA Robert Statchen
LAWS945 Small Business Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, Small Business Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled weekly seminar meeting. Students are expected to attend two full days of a mandatory orientation prior to the start of the semester. The weekly seminar incorporates business and legal practitioners from the local area. Prerequisites: LAW 551. Business Organizations, Law 553, Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student must successfully complete 32 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 2 Eve Robert Statchen
LAW 623 Title IX: Sex Discrimin. in Edu. [Details]

Description

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational institutions receiving federal funds. In the course, students will examine Title IX's applications in the context of athletics, curriculum, single-sex education, sexual harassment, pregnancy and parenting, and employment of teachers and coaches. Students will be invited to analyze and evaluate the statute's efficacy at securing gender equality in education, both in absolute terms and relative to other sources of law such as the federal and state constitution equal protection clauses, and state and local antidiscrimination statutes. Title IX will also serve as a lens through which students will engage with broader topics such as statutory and regulatory interpretation, damages and immunity, feminist legal theory, and cultural studies. This course satisfies 1 Writing unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC 2 Day Erin Buzuvis
LAW 513 Torts [Details]

Description

This is a course concerning civil liability for harm inflicted on another. Topics studied may include negligent, reckless and intentional acts that inflict harm; defenses to claims of liability; the liability of owners or occupiers of land; and strict liability. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 4 View M,W 8:30 PM-9:20 PM/Room BLC 3 Eve Julie Steiner
LAW 760 Trademark Law [Details]

Description

This course surveys the legal rules and policies governing how producers of goods and services use trademarks, logos, product designs, and other devices to identify the source of their goods and services in order to protect their good will and prevent confusion in the marketplace. The course focuses primarily on the federal trademark statute and its recent amendments, as applied in both the traditional and electronic marketplaces. This course satisfies 1 Skills unit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Amy Cohen
LAWS681 Trial Methods [Details]

Description

This course utilizes a clinical approach to trial advocacy. Emphasis is given to the two complementary abilities necessary for effective trial advocacy - preparation and execution. Students will learn effective methods for analyzing and preparing a case for trial. In addition, students will practice the technical skills necessary to present their side of a case persuasively during a trial, including tactics and strategy in the courtroom, opening statements and closing arguments, examination of witnesses, admission and exclusion of evidence, questions of burden of proof, and preservation of rights on appeal. Prerequisite: LAW 553, Evidence. Enrollment limited to 20 students per section. This course satisfies 2 Skills Units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room Mt Ct Eve Charles Belsky
LAW 748 Trusts & Estates [Details]

Description

This course is a study of the inter-vivos and testamentary gratuitous transfer of property, including intestate succession, wills, and trusts. Also discussed are the duties and liability of the fiduciary, the use of charitable donations, and the raising of constructive and resulting trusts. Prerequisite: Law 511 Property.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC C Day James Gordon

First Year Section Schedules

Registration Material

Juris Doctor Degree Requirements

 2013-2014 JD Requirement Information