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List of Courses: Spring 2017

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LAW 749 Workers' Compensation [Details]

Description

Since as far back as Ancient Rome and Greece, society has compensated injured workers for work-related accidents. This course analyzes the history and the principles of the system for compensating employees for work-related injuries. This course will provide an understanding of the core concepts of Workers' Compensation law and the mechanics of litigating and defending claims for workers' compensation benefits.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC D Eve Cheryl Jacques
LAW 670 UCC Survey [Details]

Description

This course covers the commercial sale of goods, including the law of secured debt, from the perspective of lawyers who will be representing consumers, small businesses and charitable corporations. The course will focus primarily on the Uniform Commercial Code, Articles 2 and 9. This is an elective that is highly recommended as preparation for the bar exam. Survey course in commercial transactions under the Uniform Commercial Code. Focus is upon the Uniform Commercial Code as a codified body of law with emphasis given to statutory treatment of the law of sales, secured transactions and negotiable instruments.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View Tu,Th 6:30 PM-7:45 PM/Room BLC 3 Eve Rene Reich-Graefe
LAW 748 Trusts & Estates [Details]

Description

This course is a study of the inter-vivos and testamentary gratuitous transfer of property, including intestate succession, wills, and trusts. Also discussed are the duties and liability of the fiduciary, the use of charitable donations, and the raising of constructive and resulting trusts. Prerequisite: Law 511 Property

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View Tu,Th 8:00 PM-9:15 PM/Room BLC B Eve Justin Dion
LAWS681 Trial Methods [Details]

Description

This course utilizes a clinical approach to trial advocacy. Emphasis is given to the two complementary abilities necessary for effective trial advocacy - preparation and execution. Students will learn effective methods for analyzing and preparing a case for trial. In addition, students will practice the technical skills necessary to present their side of a case persuasively during a trial, including tactics and strategy in the courtroom, opening statements and closing arguments, examination of witnesses, admission and exclusion of evidence, questions of burden of proof, and preservation of rights on appeal. Prerequisite: LAW 553, Evidence. Enrollment limited to 20 students per section. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room MTCT Eve Charles Belsky
LAWS777 Transactional Lawyering Seminar [Details]

Description

This course emphasizes the thought process and legal skills involved in the practice of transactional law. In this simulation course students will be broken up into "law firms" and will provide legal counsel to a party in a business transction. One half of the class will represent one side of the transaction and the other half will represent the other side. Using a simulated transaction as the reference point, students will acquire an understanding of the lawyer's role in business transactions and will develop an appreciation of the business and legal issues that arise in transactional practice. As part of the simulation students will be required to interview a client, draft deal documents, and negotiate some deal points. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View M 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve V. Johnson
LAWS991 Transactional Law Moot Court [Details]

Description

Selected students participate in the Transactional Lawyering Meet where students work to draft a transactional agreement and to negotiate its provisions with opposing student teams. Student competitors will combine lawyering skills, drafting, knowledge of contract, corporate and other facets of business law and business sense to develop innovative solutions for structuring the transaction. (This course satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
18 3 View BA - TBA Eric Gouvin
LAW 760 Trademark Law [Details]

Description

This course surveys the legal rules and policies governing how producers of goods and services use trademarks, logos, product designs, and other devices to identify the source of their goods and services in order to protect their good will and prevent confusion in the marketplace. The course focuses primarily on the federal trademark statute and its recent amendments, as applied in both the traditional and electronic marketplaces.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View M 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC A Eve George Pelletier
LAWS945 Small Business Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, Small Business Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled weekly seminar meeting. Students are expected to attend two full days of a mandatory orientation prior to the start of the semester. The weekly seminar incorporates business and legal practitioners from the local area. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Robert Statchen
LAWS944 Small Business Clinic [Details]

Description

The Small Business Clinic will provide selected students with the opportunity to handle legal matters for small business clients under the supervision of the professor. Students work on transactional legal matters that are typical in the start-up phase of a business. The goal of the clinic is to expose students to the methodology and mindset of business lawyering. Law students work with the entrepreneurs to identify the legal issues new businesses confront. Clinic students participate in weekly one-on-one meetings with the professor, meetings with clients (often in the evenings) and participation in walk-in legal assistance. The clinical component will involve client interviewing, assessment and intake, along with legal research, drafting, and counseling as the situation requires. In an effort to operate the clinic as close to an actual law firm as possible, students are required to maintain client billing records through use of the clinic?s time/document management software. Client work will require a minimum of 16 hours of work per week and other course commitments will require an additional four to five hours per week. Students enrolled in LAWS944 must also concurrently enroll in LAWS 945, a two-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: LAW 551 Business Organizations, Law 553 Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 4 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 4 View BA - TBA Robert Statchen
LAW 672 Representing Children [Details]

Description

This course will review children's constitutional rights followed by a study in non-delinquency matters in which children are parties (Care and Protections, Children in Need in Services, etc.). Special emphasis will be placed on counsel's role in communicating with child clients and selecting litigation options (class actions, tort actions) to protect children's rights. Child-abuse matters and state's failure to provide children's services will be emphasized.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Tu 2:30 PM-4:20 PM/Room BLC D Day Michael Donnelly
LAWS990 Rendigs - Products Liabililty MT CT [Details]

Description

Selected students participate in the August A. Rendigs National Products Liability Moot Court Competition designed to explore issues in products liability law through an appellate briefing and argument competition. (3 credits Spring / 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
35 3 View BA - TBA Julie Steiner
LAWS946 Real Property Practice Seminar [Details]

Description

In the Real Estate Practicum, selected students are placed with real estate practice and real estate practitioners and are required to commit 10 hours per week (two sessions of 5 hours). Externships are done as a member of a two-person team. One member of the team is initially placed with a real estate attorney specializing in residential real estate, the other with an attorney at a title insurance company. Each team member works for six weeks with one attorney or the other and then switches right before spring break. In both placements, students work on a variety of title, closing, contract and related problems and will observe the operation of a law office and the interaction with clients, staff and other real estate professionals (brokers, lenders, appraisers, surveyors). As indicated on the List of Pairings, two team placements are in Springfield; two are in Connecticut (Windsor Locks and Hartford); one is split between Springfield and Hartford. Students enrolled in LAWS947 must also concurrently enroll in LAWS 946, a two-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: Students must have taken 2 or more of the following 6 courses: Land Finance and Transfer, Conveyancing, Real Estate Transactions, Real Estate Finance, Real Estate Development, Land Use Planning, and Landlord-Tenant. A student must successfully complete 28 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Th 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Robert Statchen
LAWS947 Real Property Practice Practicum [Details]

Description

In addition to the field placement, students attend a regularly scheduled seminar meeting. The first two weeks of the semester involve hands-on training, homework and simulations in title examination and residential real estate closings. Thereafter, the seminar will have required readings and discussions structured and led by the two faculty members and frequently featuring presentations by experts in different aspects of real estate transactions. Prerequisites: Students must have taken 2 or more of the following courses: Land Finance and Transfer, Conveyancing, Real Estate Transactions, Real Estate Finance, Real Estate Development, Land Use Planning, and Landlor-Tenant. A student must successfully complete 28 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View BA - TBA Robert Statchen
LAWS657 Real Estate Development [Details]

Description

This course will focus on real estate development using a shopping center and a subdivision/condominium as paradigms. In the course, we will take the development project from the acquisition of land, through financing and construction, and finish with the leasing or transfer of the units. Students will be assigned to law firms of two students each and over the course of the semester each firm will negotiate with another firm three separate aspects of the development process. The firms will draft all the documents appropriate to those transactions and make short presentations on them in class. Students will prepare brief memos journaling their experience. Course grade will be based on the document drafting, journal memos, and presentations. Enrollment limited to 16 students, but the number of students must be divisible by four in order to enable firm assignments and negotiating partners; i.e. number of students may only be 4, 8, 12 or 16. Students may not drop this course after the first class. Prerequisite: LAW 730 Real Estate Finance. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC E Day Arthur Gaudio
LAW 600 Public Speaking for Lawyers [Details]

Description

Communicating with others, both lawyers and non-lawyers, is a critical skill for attorneys. Lawyers are called upon to make presentations in a variety of settings. In addition to court appearances and presentations to clients, partners, trustees, boards of directors, and professional associations, you will be called upon to make presentations before local and state government entities, city councils and town meetings, and before government agencies and legislative committees. Further, attorneys routinely speak at conferences and address organizations making informative, persuasive and commemorative speeches, introducing speakers, and presenting awards. As attorneys, you are not only expected to be knowledgeable, articulate and versed in protocol but you must always remember that you are first and foremost bound by the Canons of Professional Ethics. Your career and reputation in the community and the profession depends upon your integrity, your credibility, and your ability to speak well. This simulation course is designed to enhance your confidence in your ability to speak publicly by teaching you the fundamentals of making different types of presentations. Students will learn and demonstrate effective preparation and delivery of various presentations typical in the legal profession. The course may also include short writing assignments.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View W 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC C Eve Gale Candaras
LAW 511 Property [Details]

Description

Starting with the historical evolution of the concepts involved in real and personal property, this course will study the rights and duties of owners and possessors of property, priority of possession or property, and present and future interests in property. This course will also consider issues in landlord and tenant law, evidence of ownership or right to possession, methods of title assurance, commercial and noncommercial transfers of interests in property, the rescission, modification, interpretation and performance of transfer agreements and documents, and private controls on the use of property. This course may also explore conflicts between private ownership of property and community needs, the nature and purposes of types of shared ownership of property, and public controls on the use of property. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 4 View M,W 10:30 AM-11:40 AM/Room BLC A,
Tu 1:00 PM-2:00 PM/Room BLC A
Day Arthur Gaudio
LAW 575 Professional Responsibility [Details]

Description

This course examines the ethics of lawyering and the various roles of the lawyer. We will discuss the nature and scope of the attorney's responsibilities and obligations to clients, society, the administration of justice, the profession, and the self. It covers legal and ethical standards and aspirations relevant to regulating the conduct of lawyers and the development of professional ethics. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC A Day Bruce Miller
LAWS615 Probate Court Practice [Details]

Description

This is a survey course that will cover three areas of the law involving Probate Court. It will specifically cover Estate Administration, Guardianship/Conservatorship Administration, and Trust Administration, what is required to be filed to get these matters before the Court and how to administer them appropriately. This course will enable the student to be qualified to enter professional work as a beginning probate attorney. The course will provide students with an overall review of the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code and how it governs these three areas of the law. The course will address what to know before filing petitions and then specifically how to get them admitted into probate. The course will be broken down into three sections, whereby probate estate administration and guardianship/conservatorship administration topics will be covered for approximately 5 weeks and trusts will be covered for approximately 2 to 3 weeks. This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits. This course is limited to 20 students.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Th 10:00 AM-11:50 AM/Room BLC 1 Day TBA
LAW 770 New York Practice and Procedure [Details]

Description

This course is designed to introduce the New York Court System and its procedure, pursuant to the Civil Practice Law & Rules (CPLR). The concept of jurisdiction in the state will be examined in detail as well as the commencement of a civil action and its interplay with jurisdictional principles, within, and outside New York's boundaries. A variety of issues will then be reviewed, such as service, defects of same, defenses to, and appearances. Important emphasis will be placed on limitations of time in actions, such as intentional torts, and medical malpractice, taking into account laches, tolls, extensions, and interposing other claims.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 2 Eve Mark Powers
LAWS769 Negotiation,Mediation & Arbitration [Details]

Description

This course will focus on negotiation and other methods of dispute resolution, with emphasis on negotiated settlement, mediation and arbitration. Negotiation theory and alternative tactics and strategies will be examined, with focus on practical skills by way of example and simulated exercises. Various methods of alternative dispute resolution will be discussed in the context of different areas of legal practice and substantive law. Students will participate in both a simulated negotiation and a simulated mediation. In addition, the course will cover the arbitration process from both a substantive law and practical skills standpoint. Students will have an elective opportunity to write an Arbitrator's Decision and Award as their final paper, based upon the evidentiary submissions in an actual case. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. Students who have taken LAW 609 Negotiation: Strategies & Practice may not enroll in this course. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View W 10:00 AM-11:50 AM/Room BLC 2 Day Nancy Sykes
LAWS986 National Moot Court Team [Details]

Description

Selected students participate in the National Moot Court Competition. This competition allows students to develop appellate advocacy skills through intellectual rigor, legal research, and persuasive argument. Student competitors will prepare a brief and argue a case, generally concerning statutory or constitutional issues, in the United States Supreme Court. National Moot Court Team. 2 credits fall / 2 experiental learning credits and 1 credit spring / 1 experiential learning credit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
14 1 View BA - TBA Harris Freeman
QWCS752 Muncipal Law [Details]

Description

This course focuses on the many forms of local American governments and the sources and limitations of local governmental power. From the standpoint of both historical context and contemporary practice, students will examine the relationship of local municipalities to (1) state and federal governments, (2) other local governmental entities, and (3) constituents. Students will study specific topics such as the powers and mechanisms for local governments to raise revenue and expend funds, enact and enforce local laws and provide services to citizens. Throughout the course, participants will consider the municipal attorney's role as an advisor to elected and appointed officials, and the potential conflicts of interest that such lawyers face. Students will be required to write three (3) memorandums of law and present three (3) oral arguments. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits or 2 writing units.)Enrollment is limited to 16 students.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Elizabeth Rodriguez-Ross
LAW 704 Medical Liability Quality [Details]

Description

This is a survey course that will cover a variety of issues relating to health care access, delivery and reimbursement for services. Topics will include the duty to provide care, discrimination in access to health care, insurance contract interpretation, federal regulation of insurance including ERISA, professional relationships in health care enterprises, and fraud and abuse. (This course was formerly known as Law of Health Care Entities.) This course will be offered online. The computer lab in the library room 329 will also be on reserve for this class.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room online Day Barbara Noah
LAW 763 Mass Practice & Procedure [Details]

Description

This course provides students with a practical understanding of Massachusetts practice and procedure as it relates to criminal litigation. Students will learn practice and procedure from arraignment to post-conviction relief. The course will emphasize the practices and procedures that are most relevant to the daily practice of law and the most common issues that litigants face in Massachusetts courts. Students will develop a useful understanding of how the practice of law is grounded in the Massachusetts Rules of Criminal Procedure as well as relevant statutory and case law authority.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC B Eve Thomas Estes
LAW 711 Licensing of Intellectual Property [Details]

Description

This course provides an overview of the licensing characteristics of intellectual property including considerations for licensing of patents, trademarks, trade secrets and copyrights. This course includes an interactive negotiation and drafting of a mock licensing agreement over the course of the semester. Attributes of E-commerce, software, shrink-wrap, click-wrap and database licenses, distributorship licenses, research and development licenses, university technology licenses and joint venture agreement licenses are presented. The essential elements of licensing agreements including grant clauses, royalty, fee and payment clauses, indemnification clauses, termination clauses, confidentiality clauses, best effort clauses, quality control clauses and remedies clauses are presented for use in the drafting of the mock licensing agreement. Antitrust concerns in intellectual property licensing including patent misuse are presented for use and consideration in drafting the mock licensing agreement. Licensing resources are introduced including case law, sample licensing clauses, licensing treatises and actual licensing agreements for use by the students in drafting the mock licensing agreement.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve John Mutchler
LAWS910 Legal Services: Skills Seminar [Details]

Description

This seminar is a prerequisite for selected students participating in the Legal Services Clinic. Students enroll in this course the semester preceding their clinic placement. The course focuses on substantive law and issues related to poverty law practice, and developing basic lawyering skills, including professionalism and ethics, client interviewing, counseling, case planning, fact investigation, oral advocacy, negotiation and litigation skills. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Tu 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC F Day TBA
LAWS917 Legal Services Clinic Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, Legal Services Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled seminar meeting. This concurrent seminar will serve as a forum for reflection on the fieldwork, case review, and other topics. Prerequisites: LAWS910 Legal Service Skills and LAW 553 Evidence (Evidence may be taken concurrently). (This course and satisfies 1 experiential learning credit.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 1 View Tu 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC F Day TBA
LAWS916 Legal Services Clinic [Details]

Description

Selected students work in the office of Community Legal Aid (CLA), a local non-profit organization charged with providing free civil legal services to low-income and elderly persons. Under the supervision of CLA attorneys, students assume primary professional responsibility for actual cases, including client interviews, counseling, case development, negotiation, and representation of clients in court and administrative proceedings. Students are expected to commit 16 hours per week to the fieldwork at CLA. Students enrolled in LAWS 916 must also concurrently enroll in LAWS 917, a one-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: Successful completion of LAWS 910 Legal Service Skills Seminar and LAW 553 Evidence. Evidence may be taken concurrently with the Clinic. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 4 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 4 View BA - TBA TBA
LAW 508 Lawyering Skills II [Details]

Description

Lawyering Skills II is a required first-year course designed to introduce students to the essential problem-solving and communication skills of the legal profession. The legal research and writing faculty work closely with students in smaller classroom settings to introduce techniques of legal analysis, the basic sources and processes of legal research, and the principles of legal writing and oral advocacy. Through a series of assignments of increasing complexity, students learn how to analyze legal problems, research legal issues, frame legal arguments, and gain experience in drafting the major forms of predictive and persuasive legal writing. During the second semester, in Lawyering Skills II, students will focus on the role of lawyer as an advocate by focusing on persuasive writing and drafting. In this context, students will assume the role and professional obligations of a lawyer by drafting legal arguments and documents on behalf of clients. Students will write a trial brief and argue a dispositive motion in a trial court simulation. Students will continue to receive individualized feedback throughout the semester. (required course; graded; two-credits) (prerequisite: successful completion of Lawyering Skills I)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
10 2 View M,W 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room BLC 3 Day Beth Cohen
15 2 View W 1:00 PM-1:50 PM/Room BLC 1,
M 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC 1
Day Myra Orlen
17 2 View W 1:00 PM-1:50 PM/Room BLC 3,
M 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC 3
Day Harris Freeman
18 2 View M,W 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room BLC 4 Day Harris Freeman
39 2 View M,W 6:00 PM-6:50 PM/Room BLC 2 Eve Patricia Newcombe
LAW 950 Law Review Staff [Details]

Description

Students who are staff members of Law Review are required to attend the mandatory weekly Law Review staff meeting for both the fall and spring semesters. Staff members of Law Review receive 2 credits in the fall and 1 credit in the spring for the successful completion of their Law Review Staff year. Law Review staff will receive 2 writing units in the fall and 1 writing unit in the spring.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 1 View M 5:00 PM-6:00 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Erin Buzuvis
LAW 954 Law Review Board [Details]

Description

Students who are Board members of Law Review are required to attend the mandatory weekly Law Review staff meeting for both the fall and spring semesters. Board members of the Law Review receive between 2 and 6 credits per year, depending on their position on the Law Review. The Associate Dean must approve departures from these semester credit allocations.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 1 View M 5:00 PM-6:00 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Erin Buzuvis
04 2 View M 5:00 PM-6:00 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Erin Buzuvis
05 3 View M 5:00 PM-6:00 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Erin Buzuvis
LAWS809 Law Practice Externship Seminar [Details]

Description

This course is the seminar component that accompanies the first public interest, government service, or private sector externship placement that a student has been selected for through the externship application process. Seminar assignments and readings are designed to complement the individual work experience by providing structured reflection on many aspects of the roles of courts, judges and lawyers in society. Students are also required to maintain weekly time sheets and journals and complete a Learning Agenda. (This course satisfies 1 experiential learning credit.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
10 1 View M 4:00 PM-4:50 PM/Room BLC 3 Day Beth Cohen
LAWS808 Law Practice Externship [Details]

Description

Students work 12-15 hours a week for a total of 168 semester hours engaging in a variety of legal work under the supervision of an attorney in a public interest, government service, or private sector externship placement. Students may not receive compensation for work done in an Externship. Externships develop students' lawyering skills through participation in activities such as legal research and writing, client interviewing and counseling, factual investigation, development and implementation of case theory and strategy, negotiation, mediation, litigation and other forms of advocacy. Students may take no more than three externships during law school. Students enrolled in their first externship must also concurrently enroll in a one-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: An externship is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
10 3 View BA - TBA Beth Cohen
LAWS636 Law Office Simulation [Details]

Description

This course is designed for motivated students with an interest in developing their own firm at graduation or in the future. The course is designed to introduce students to business principles, the Business Model Canvas, and business planning and implementation. Students will use these principles in conjunction with real world research to develop a business model and modified business plan for the formation of a new law firm. Topics to be covered will be ethical requirements, unauthorized practice of law considerations, market research, marketing, staffing, office space requirements, office technology and systems, and financial management (including budgeting, revenue, and expenses). Periodic projects will be assigned during the course which will be used for grading. There will not be a final examination. Law 632 Law Office Management is a recommended but not a prequisite. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Th 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC D Eve Michael Agen
QWC 668 Law and Terrorism [Details]

Description

The attacks of September 11, 2001, presented unusual and arguably unprecedented challenges to American legal values and institutions. This course will explore some of the ways in which our legal system has responded to those challenges. We will examine these responses from positive perspectives (How have legal institutions been engaged in combating terrorism and dealing with questions of civil and human rights?) and normative perspectives (To what degree have responses of our legal system been appropriate and just? How do they compare to responses to terrorism in other nations?). We will consider a number of topics, including the definition of terrorism, confinement of suspected terrorists at the Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba, detainee treatment, military commissions, terrorism-related prosecutions commenced by the United States government, and national security-related surveillance and intelligence-gathering. We will consider each topic from the perspectives of statutory, constitutional, and where relevant, comparative and international law. Assessment is based on two short writing projects, responses to weekly posted discussion questions, and class participation. There is no final exam for this course. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. (This course satisfies 2 writing units.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Th 2:30 PM-4:20 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Sudha Setty
QWC 642 Law and Social Change [Details]

Description

This seminar offers an investigation of issues faced by lawyers representing low-income clients and serving under-represented, disenfranchised groups. Cases, theoretical readings and historical texts are interwoven with several ends in mind: first, to provide a glimpse into the range of public interest work lawyers are engaged in and the intellectual foundations that guide these efforts; second, to consider the contexts in which the tools of public interest advocacy are more or less effective, with particular emphasis on the relationship of public interest lawyering to social movements of disenfranchised groups in American society. Third, to expose students to ethical issues and career development challenges that arise for public interest practitioners. The course grade will be based on students completing a variety of short written exercises, class participation and a major research paper. There will be no final exam. Enrollment limited to 20 students. This course satisfies 2 writing units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Tu 10:00 AM-11:50 AM/Room BLC 4 Day Harris Freeman
QWC 625 Land Use [Details]

Description

This course will cover the fundamentals of land use currently in place in the United States. The course covers zoning, large-track development, smart growth development and environmental impact review. Students may not take both this course and LAW 624 Land Use Controls. The course is based upon two writing assignments and a final examination. This course satisfies 2 writing units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC C Day Julie Steiner
LAWS806 Judicial Externship Seminar [Details]

Description

This course is the seminar component that accompanies the first judicial externship placement that a student has been selected for through the externship application process. Seminar assignments and readings are designed to complement the individual work experience by providing structured reflection on many aspects of the roles of courts, judges and lawyers in society. Students are also required to maintain weekly time sheets and journals and complete a Learning Agenda. (This course satisfies 1 experiential learning credit.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
10 1 View M 4:00 PM-4:50 PM/Room BLC 3 Day Beth Cohen
LAWS807 Judicial Externship [Details]

Description

Students work 12-15 hours a week for a total of 168 semester hours engaging in a variety of legal work under the supervision of a judge. Students may not receive compensation for work done in an Externship. Externships include varied levels of research, writing, and observation depending on the student's placement. Students may take no more than three externships during law school. Students enrolled in their first externship must also concurrently enroll in a one-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: An externship is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
10 3 View BA - TBA Beth Cohen
LAWS983 Jessup International MTCT Team [Details]

Description

Selected students participate in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. Student competitors argue a hypothetical case on issues of international law as if before the International Court of Justice. The hypothetical case usually involves topical issues in international law. Student competitors prepare oral and written pleadings arguing both the applicant and respondent positions of the case. Jessup International Moot Court Team. 2 credits fall / 2 experiental learning credits and 1 credit spring / 1 experiential learning credit.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
07 1 View BA - TBA Arthur Wolf
LAW 502 Intro to the Legal Profession [Details]

Description

Introduction to the Legal Profession is a one-credit required course for all first year students, offered prior to the beginning of the second term. This skills course is designed to introduce students to aspects of legal practice through a simulated client representation. The goals of the course include helping students develop an understanding of the importance of professionalism, legal ethics, and competency and to provide opportunities for students to engage in hands-on lawyering skills. The class is graded pass/fail. (Required course) This course meet four days only and will run Monday, January 9th - Thursday, January 12th. The day section will meet 1:00PM - 4:15PM and the evening section will meet 6:00PM - 9:15PM.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 1 View M,Tu,W,Th 1:00 PM-4:15 PM/Room BLC A Day Eric Gouvin
03 1 View M,Tu,W,Th 6:00 PM-9:15 PM/Room BLC 3 Eve Eric Gouvin
LAWS913 International Human Rights Seminar [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, International Human Rights Clinic students attend a regularly scheduled seminar meeting which will include guest speakers and simulated exercises. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View W 10:00 AM-11:50 AM/Room LIB 328 Day Lauren Carasik
LAWS912 International Human Rights Clinic [Details]

Description

Selected students work collaboratively on projects with domestic and international nongovernmental organizations, grass-roots organizations, solidarity networks, attorneys, stakeholders, and other institutions engaging in human rights work, to advance political, economic, social and cultural human rights across borders. Students are expected to commit at least 16 hours per week to the fieldwork. Students enrolled in LAWS912 must also concurrently enroll in LAWS 913, a two-credit seminar, with their semester of fieldwork. Prerequisites: The clinic is open to students who have successfully completed 28 hours of law studies. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 4 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 4 View BA - TBA Lauren Carasik
LAW 603 International Criminal Law [Details]

Description

In this course we will discuss the application of domestic and international law to questions of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, international cooperation in criminal matters, substantive international law contained in multilateral treaties concerning war crimes and terrorism, and the permanent International Criminal Court. The course consists of a series of topics, organized around the principles and offenses of international criminal law, including: nature and sources of international criminal law; nature and elements of responsibility and defenses against responsibility; basis of jurisdictional competence of states under international law; methods for obtaining persons abroad; attempts over time, including through international tribunals, to secure punishment for international crimes; offenses against peace; war crimes; crimes against humanity; genocide; terrorism; and the intersection between international crimes and human rights.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC C Day Matthew Charity
LAW 747 Income Tax II [Details]

Description

A continuation of the study of the law as it relates to the federal taxation of the income of individuals. This course explores the tax concepts of realization and recognition of income, the character of gains and losses from the disposition of property, and tax accounting methods. The course also explores the role of debt in property transactions and may include a discussion of assignment of income principles. Prerequisite: Law 555 Income Tax I.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View M,W 6:30 PM-7:45 PM/Room BLC C Eve Frederick Royal
LAW 651 Immigration Law [Details]

Description

This course will explore the American immigration system from constitutional, statutory, and policy perspectives. Topics considered include the source and scope of congressional power to regulate immigration, standards and procedures for entry, exclusion, and deportation, illegal migration, and the acquisition and loss of American citizenship.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC C Day Arthur Wolf
LAW 716 First Amendment Rights [Details]

Description

This course is a basic introduction to the free speech guarantee of the First Amendment. Among the topics to be studied are the special problems of particular kinds of speech including advocacy of violence as a political solution, libel, obscenity, hate speech, commercial speech, and symbolic speech such as flag burning, particular techniques employed by the government to censor speech such as prior restraints and time, place and manner restrictions, and access to public property including streets and parks to exercise rights of expression.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 4:00 PM-5:15 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Taylor Flynn
QWCS757 Federal Litigation: Pension Rights [Details]

Description

This simulation course focuses on the pre-trial stages of a hypothetical ERISA case in federal district court. Although some aspects of substantive ERISA law will be addressed, the chief aims of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to improve their writing, oral advocacy, and negotiation skills and to consider the strategic, political, and ethical dimensions of federal court litigation. Each student will be required to write several briefs and to present at least one oral argument. In addition, each student will draft a complaint or an answer, draft a discovery plan, prepare for a pre-trial conference, and engage in settlement negotiations. This is a Restricted Withdrawal class which means that a student enrolled in the class may not withdraw subsequent to the second class of the semester (see, Academic Standards Part A, VI, B). Enrollment limited to 24 students. This course is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits or 3 writing units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View Tu,Th 8:00 PM-9:15 PM/Room BLC A Eve Bruce Miller
LAWS974 Family Law Mediation Clinic Seminar [Details]

Description

Family Law Mediation Clinic Concurrent Seminar (1 credit, 1 experiential learning credit.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 1 View W 5:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC F Eve Oran Kaufman
LAWS973 Family Law Mediation Clinic [Details]

Description

The Hampden Probate Court Mediation Clinic will provide students with the opportunity to mediate family law cases at the Hampden Probate and Family Court under the supervision of the professor who will co-mediate cases assigned to the clinic by the Hampden probate and Family Court. The clinic will include observing and learning court process, including involvement in the screening process in conjunction with The Mediation and Training Collaborative, a local Community mediation organization. Students enrolled in this clinic must also concurrently enroll in the one-credit concurrent seminar to be held following the clinic each week to discuss the mediation experience and to continue to build mediation skills. Students will be selected through the clinic application process in the fall. Prerequisites: Mediation LAWS 728 and Family Law, LAW 643 (which can be taken concurrently). This clinic/extership is a Restricted Withdrawal Course. See Academic Standard Section 204 and the Clinic and Externship materials for the applicable time restrictions and policies. (Satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View BA - TBA Oran Kaufman
LAW 643 Family Law [Details]

Description

This course examines the relationship between family and law. Topics addressed include legal definitions of "family" taking into consideration both the marital and non-marital family; rights and obligatons among family members; the federal and state government's role in family life as well as the constitutional limits on government involvement; dissolution of family including issues of property distribution, alimony/support, and the implications of children; jurisdiction; and the role of the attorney in family formation and disputes.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View M,W 8:00 PM-9:15 PM/Room BLC D Eve Taylor Flynn
LAW 553 Evidence [Details]

Description

This course is an introduction to the basic rules of evidence governing the proof of facts in criminal and civil trials, with a focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Topics covered may include the role of the judge and jury; relevance; hearsay and its exceptions; character evidence; and the competency, examination and impeachment of witnesses. Classroom method focuses on discussion of selected problems and cases and aims at providing all students with a common grounding in the basic rules of evidence. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View M,W 6:00 PM-7:15 PM/Room BLC C Eve Anne Goldstein
QWCS723 Estate Planning [Details]

Description

This course is the study of the inter vivos and testamentary disposition of accumulated wealth. Students draft simple and complex estate plans. Emphasis is given also to the tax and non-tax considerations that influence the transfer and future management of wealth. Prerequisites: LAW 722 Estate and Gift Tax and LAW 748 Trusts & Estates. Enrollment limited to 16 students. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits or 3 writing units.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View W 5:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC A Eve TBA
LAWS977 Elder Law Clinic Seminar [Details]

Description

Elder Law Clinic Concurrent Seminar (1 credit, 1 experiential learning credit)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 1 View M 5:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room CLINIC Eve Elizabeth Lovejoy
LAWS976 Elder Law Clinic [Details]

Description

Students in the Elder Law Clinic will represent elders in a range of matters under the supervision of the clinic supervisor. Representation may include planning for incapacity with powers of attorney and heath care proxies, planning for the disposition of property at death via joint ownership, beneficiary designation, and simple Wills, and planning for eligibility for public benefits for long-term care. Students will gain experience in identifying the client and assessing client capacity, two areas of special importance in elder law. Students will also gain experience in interviewing and counseling, drafting documents, memoranda and letters, and overseeing the valid execution of documents. Students enrolled in this clinic must also concurrently enroll in the one-credit concurrent seminar to be held following the clinic each week. Students will be selected through the clinic application process in the fall. Prerequisite: Elder Law LAW 664. This clinic/extership is a Restricted Withdrawal Course. See Academic Standard Section 204 and the Clinic and Externship materials for the applicable time restrictions and policies. (Satisfies 3 experiential learning credits)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 3 View BA - TBA Elizabeth Lovejoy
LAW 644 Domestic Violence [Details]

Description

This course combines a scholarly and practice-oriented approach to understanding the legal response to domestic violence. Throughout the course, we will focus on the social context of battering, including how the experience of abuse is shaped by gender, race, cultural identity, immigration status, sexual orientation, and disabilities. We will cover the various legal remedies in both civil and criminal contexts and examine their efficacy. These include the role of protective orders in both civil and criminal courts. We will also discuss domestic violence in relation to divorce, child custody, support, visitation, and the child protection matters. Gender violence as a human rights violation, sexual assault law, and the role of the domestic violence movement are also introduced. The focus of this course is to examine current challenges and shortcomings in the legal response to domestic violence, and then consider proposals for alternative strategies for systemic change.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View M 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Beth Lux
LAW 776 Cybercrime Digital Evidence [Details]

Description

This course is designed to be an introduction to Cyber Crime and Digital Evidence. In this course, the students will explore how our current age of information and technology offers new challenges to the existing framework of not only criminal law but also criminal procedure, particularly within the investigative arm of the Fourth Amendment. We will discuss the use of digital evidence in criminal cases and offer a broader framework of digital evidence within the context of the Fourth Amendment. Key questions include: How has the age of information and technology spawned new types of crimes? What new techniques and practices are required to identify cybercriminal activity? How are law enforcement agencies responding to the dangers that cybercrimes create? This course will explore a range of central issues from deciphering the existence of a person's reasonable expectation of privacy in cyberspace to how law enforcement techniques are shifting from traditional mechanisms of crime control to new regulatory rules, including the use of technology.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC 2 Day Bridgette Baldwin
LAW 796 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication [Details]

Description

This course examines the constitutional basis of criminally accused persons' post-arrest rights, in the context of, e.g.: bail and pretrial release, discovery, the right to counsel, guilty pleas, burdens and standards of proof, selection and composition of the jury, confrontation, effective assistance of counsel, jury instructions, double jeopardy, and other rights incident to criminal trials, appeals, and collateral review. Completion of LAW 706 Criminal Procedure: Investigation is NOT a prerequisite to enroll in this course. Students taking this course may not enroll in LAW 784 Criminal Procedure: Survey.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC C Day Anne Goldstein
LAW 784 Criminal Procedure Survey [Details]

Description

In this course, we will explore the constitutional rules that control the behavior of police officers when they investigate crime and prosecute criminal defendants. Specifically, this course will survey the impact of the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Eighth Amendments on police investigations and also analyze the ways in which constitutional guarantees of due process, equal protection, and trial by jury impact criminal prosecutions. To this end, this course will provide an overview of criminal procedure issues arising during police investigation, arrest, prosecution, trial and post-conviction NOTE: Students who take this course may NOT also take either Criminal Adjudication or Criminal Investigation. Although this course will touch on some of the topics in Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication, not all of these subject areas will be reviewed. For this reason, this course is intended for students who do not intend to practice Criminal Law, but want an introduction to criminal procedure. Students planning to practice criminal law or who have a significant interest in the field should consider taking both the Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication courses, which together provide a more in-depth study of criminal procedure law.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC D Day Mary Hiser
QWCS780 Criminal Procedure Simulation [Details]

Description

This course concentrates on the procedural stages of two hypothetical criminal cases from arraignment through trial. The principal purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to improve their writing and trial skills in the context of preparing and trying a state criminal case. Students will be required to research, write and re-write pretrial motions along with supporting affidavits and memoranda of law and to litigate two simulated exercises, a pretrial motion to suppress and a jury trial. Prerequisites: LAW 706 Criminal Procedure: Investigation or LAW 784 Criminal Procedure Survey and LAW 553 Evidence. Students, who have not taken or registered to take LAW 905 Criminal Law Clinic, will be given priority in registering for this course. Enrollment is limited to 12 students. (This course is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits or 3 writing units.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room MTCT Day Tina Cafaro
LAWS617 Criminal Pre-Trial Practice [Details]

Description

This course is aimed at developing student written and oral advocacy skills in the pre-trial phase of criminal litigation. The course will concentrate on the pre-trial stages of a hypothetical criminal case. The course will allow students to work on this case from the pre-trial conference up to jury selection. Students will brief and argue typical evidentiary and discovery motions arising prior to trial. The course will also address pre-trial strategies and preparation, including motions in limine, and jury instructions. At the end of the term students will present oral arguments on motions to suppress statements, identification and evidence. The course will require at least 4 hours of preparation per session. Class attendance is mandatory. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View W 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Charles Groce
LAWS923 Criminal Law Defense Practicum Sem. [Details]

Description

In addition to the fieldwork, there is a classroom component which operates as a combination seminar/simulation. This part of the course is quite intensive for the first three or four weeks of the semester as well as the week prior to the start of classes. Students must attend a two day orientation the week before classes begin; no exceptions will be made to this mandatory orientation. Following this initial training period, the class will meet at a designated time for a two-hour session on a weekly basis for the balance of the semester. (This course satisfies 2 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Tu 9:00 AM-10:50 AM/Room MTCT Day Tina Cafaro
LAWS922 Criminal Law Defense Practicum [Details]

Description

Students in the Criminal Defense Practicum work as student defense attorneys at the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) within the Hampden County District Courts. By court rule, students in the Practicum are authorized to practice in any District Court case, which includes a mix of both misdemeanors and felonies. Typical of the offenses litigated by students in the District Court are possession and/or distribution of controlled substances, assault and battery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, and violation of a restraining order, larceny, assault and battery on a police officer, and driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. During the course of the semester, a student attorney will appear in three different sessions of the District Court: the arraignment session (in which students represent indigent defendants in bail hearings), the motion session (in which students prepare and litigate motions to suppress and motions to dismiss) and, ultimately, the trial session (in which a student prepare and litigate jury and jury-waived trials.) This clinic allows students to gain substantial exposure over the course of the semester to the entire process of litigating a criminal case. Prerequisites: LAW 553, Evidence and LAW 706, Criminal Procedure Investigation. Enrollment is limited to 5 third-year full time and fourth-year part time students who have been selected through the clinic application process. A student is required to be SJC Rule 3:03 eligible. A student must successfully complete 28 hours of law studies before enrollment in a clinic. A student may not simultaneously enroll in more than one clinic, more than one externship, or a clinic and an externship. (This course satisfies 4 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 4 View BA - TBA Tina Cafaro
LAW 505 Criminal Law [Details]

Description

This course deals with the competing interests and policies that come into action when the individual clashes with society. The course also explores the underlying philosophical premises of various penal rules. The theories and purposes of punishment, the relationship between law and morality, definitions of criminal intent, principles of necessity, justification and excuse, and inchoate crime and group criminality may also be studied. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 4 View Th 6:00 PM-7:10 PM/Room BLC 3,
M 7:00 PM-8:10 PM/Room BLC 3,
W 8:20 PM-9:20 PM/Room BLC 3
Eve Bridgette Baldwin
LAW 739 Copyright Law [Details]

Description

This course will focus on the legal protection given the creators of literary, artistic, musical, and related works. The course emphasis will be on copyright law's attempt to balance the rights of creators with the public's interest in access to creative works.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View W 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve TBA
LAW 503 Contracts [Details]

Description

This course introduces students to the law governing legally enforceable agreements with a focus on the rights and duties of contracting parties. In focusing on how promissory relationships are created by the parties, the course emphasizes how these relationships are interpreted, limited, discharged, breached, and enforced. The course also addresses the ethical and equitable considerations affecting the contracting parties. (Required course.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 4 View F 9:30 AM-10:30 AM/Room BLC A,
M,Th 1:00 PM-2:10 PM/Room BLC A
Day Matthew Charity
03 4 View W 7:00 PM-8:10 PM/Room BLC 3,
Th 7:20 PM-8:30 PM/Room BLC 3,
M 8:20 PM-9:20 PM/Room BLC 3
Eve Jennifer Levi
LAW 501 Constitutional Law [Details]

Description

This course is a study of the allocation of governmental authority and the limitations on that authority as defined by the Constitution of the United States. The course will deal with the problems of defining the scope of federal power, the relationship between the federal government and the states, the scope of state authority, and the rights of individuals with an emphasis on those rights guaranteed by the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Constitution. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 4 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:40 AM/Room BLC A,
F 10:45 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC A
Day Sudha Setty
03 4 View M,W 7:30 PM-9:20 PM/Room BLC B Eve Arthur Wolf
LAW 798 Connecticut Practice & Procedure [Details]

Description

This course provides students with a practical understanding of Connecticut practice and procedure as it relates to criminal and civil litigation. The course will emphasize the practices and procedures that are most relevant to the daily practice of law and the most common issues that litigants face in Connecticut courts. Students will develop a useful understanding of how the practice of law is grounded in the Connecticut Procedural Rules as well as relevant statutory and case law authority.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC 4 Eve Joseph Burns
QWCS724 Business Succession Planning [Details]

Description

This course will consider the issues that owners of closely held businesses face in the operation and disposition of their business interests. The course will consider the operational and transfer problems for unrelated business owners as well as the operational and transfer problems for family owned businesses. Areas of study will include buy/sell agreements, life insurance, and alternative methods of succession. Note: This course was formerly called Business & Estate Planning/Closely-Held Business Entities. Limited to 24 Students. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits or 3 writing units.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 1:00 PM-2:15 PM/Room BLC D Day Frederick Royal
LAW 551 Business Organizations [Details]

Description

This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual framework of business organizations law including the formation and conduct of business in the partnership, corporate, and limited liability company forms. It provides an introduction to the terminology of business organizations and finance, and transmits some sense of what a business lawyer does. It also engages in questions of ethics, justice, professional responsibility and critical analysis of numerous aspects of business law. (Required Course)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 10:30 AM-11:45 AM/Room BLC B Day Rene Reich-Graefe
LAW 699 Business Bankruptcy [Details]

Description

Recommended for those who intend to practice business law in any form, this course constitutes an intensive overview of Chapter 11, the business reorganization (and often liquidation) provisions available to failing businesses under the federal Bankruptcy Code. Students are exposed to the perspectives of both debtors and creditors in the bankruptcy process. It is required that LAW 746 Secured Transactions be taken previously, but this requirement may be waived by the advance consent of the instructor and approval by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 6:30 PM-7:45 PM/Room BLC A Eve Henry Boroff
LAWS610 Bankruptcy Court Practice [Details]

Description

This course utilizes a clinical approach to trial advocacy in the unique practice environment of the United States Bankruptcy Court. The course will emphasize both written and oral advocacy. Although focused primarily on consumer bankruptcy practice under Chapters 7 and 13, issues under Chapter 11 will also be considered. Students will be exposed to the technical skills necessary to effectively represent their clients, including tactics and strategy in the courtroom. Prerequisite: LAW 698, Consumer Bankruptcy Law. Enrollment limited to 20 students per section. (This is a simulation course and satisfies 3 experiential learning credits.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View Tu,Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC C Day Henry Boroff
QWC 733 Alternative Reproductive Technology [Details]

Description

Just days after the turn of the last century, Justice O'Connor commented in a family law case that, "The demographic changes of the past century make it difficult to speak of an average American family. The composition of family varies greatly from household to household." Among these demographic changes and family composition are families formed by access to alternative reproductive technologies ("ART"). While some states have attempted to update laws to reflect the reality of the growing number of families created and shaped by access to ART, many more have exclusively had their legal regimes shaped by common law developments and a mosaic of regulatory and non-regulatory public policy. This course will focus on the broad range of topics with which individuals and their families intersect when accessing ART. Topics included, among others, will be: surrogacy; use, ownership and control of frozen embryos, second-parent adoption for non-genetic (sometimes same-sex) parents, insurance coverage, regulation of donor insemination; relevant provisions of uniform laws; and, role and enforcement of contracts in this area. The course will include a practice component as well as coverage of doctrine. A basic family law course is a prerequisite for this class. Enrollment is limited to 24 students. (This course satisfies 2 writing units.)

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 2 View Th 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC 1 Day Jennifer Levi
LAW 604 Advanced Torts: Business Torts [Details]

Description

Business Torts loosely refers to causes of action for economic harm between businesses or individuals acting within a business context, other than for breach of contract. This course will survey a variety of such causes of action not covered in depth in the basic contracts and torts courses, but which form the core of many lawyers' civil litigation practices. Topics covered may include breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, misrepresentation, tortious interference with contract and economic advantage, investor litigation, trade secrets, employment torts, unfair competition, and violation of state unfair trade practices statutes. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed upon the practicalities of business-related civil litigation, including strategy, the economics of business litigation and "best practices" lawyering. There is no casebook required for this course. All case materials and readings are available electronically or as handouts.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View M 8:00 PM-9:50 PM/Room BLC C Eve Michael Blanchard
LAW 799 Advanced Legal Analysis II [Details]

Description

This Course builds on the skills and knowledge attained in Advanced Legal Analysis I. It explores topics not covered in Advanced Legal Analysis I, including Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law/Procedure and Property. In addition to this work in new subject matter areas, the course provides continued development of the analytical and writing skills necessary for bar examination success. Students will learn how the bar examiners test these topics and will learn how to study and to apply their knowledge to bar exam questions. The course is pass-fail, with the pass/fail determination based on 1) attendance and 2) completion of assignments. Students will receive feedback throughout the course. Students may enroll in this course in addition to ALA 1 or may take it to satisfy their bar course requirement. Students must successfully complete one ALA course to graduate.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 2 View Tu 4:00 PM-5:50 PM/Room BLC D Day Kandace Kukas
03 2 View Th 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC B Eve Kandace Kukas
QWC 759 Advanced Land Use & Environ Law [Details]

Description

This course will examine advanced land use and environmental law topics. Students enrolling in the seminar must prepare a research paper, make a presentation to the class, and actively participate in class discussion. Students will work with the professor to select a topic for the research paper, which can be drawn from topics covered in class or another topic of interest to the student and acceptable to the professor. This course satisfies 3 writing units.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
02 3 View M,W 2:30 PM-3:45 PM/Room BLC 4 Day Julie Steiner
LAW 773 Accounting for Lawyers [Details]

Description

This course will introduce law students to accounting, giving them a basic understanding of financial statements, accounting mechanics, and underlying accounting concepts and principles. The course is designed for students with little-to-no background in accounting. In addition to basic accounting, we will discuss such issues as professional governance and standard setting, topics currently being reviewed by the accounting regulators and/or Congress, recent accounting scandals, Sarbanes-Oxley, and difference between the practice of law and of accounting (including ethical foundations).

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
03 2 View Tu 6:00 PM-7:50 PM/Room BLC 3 Eve Henry Drapalski
LAW 995 Academic Success Workshop [Details]

Description

Academic Success Program skills workshops are open to all interested students. The workshops cover essential law school skills such as note-taking, briefing cases, outlining, and exam-taking techniques. All students are encouraged to attend.

Sections

Section Credits Books Time/Location D/E Professor
01 0 View Tu 9:30 AM-10:20 AM/Room BLC 1 Day Myra Orlen
02 0 View Th 2:30 PM-3:20 PM/Room BLC B Day Myra Orlen
03 0 View Th 8:30 PM-9:20 PM/Room BLC 1 Eve Myra Orlen

Juris Doctor Degree Requirements

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Main University: 413-782-3111
Admissions: 413-782-1406 or 800-782-6665